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Celebrating & Preparing For Your Big Day with OurWeddingDay.com Today is Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Wedding Garters: How to Make Your Own

Apr08

The wedding garter toss was one of the first wedding traditions, and is still present at some weddings today. If you’re on the fence about having a wedding garter on your big day, then some research could help guide you toward your final decision. Knowing what a wedding garter set’s
use is, and possibly how to make it on your own could influence your decision.

If you’re a young bride, you many not be aware of the history of the garter toss, since they aren’t as prevalent amongst modern weddings as they used to be. The lace wedding garter used to be one of the most important wedding accessories and a close second to the ubiquitous bridal bouquet. There are a few wedding garter traditions, for example that it has always been worn high up on the bride’s thigh.

If you choose yes, then picking a garter that fits your size and unique style is of the utmost importance. The best way to ensure your wedding garter is exactly what you want is by making it yourself.

How does one make a wedding garter? It’s a moderately difficult task, but you’ll find that it could be worth every ounce of energy you put into it. You will need the following materials to create your very own wedding garter is a 3” wide fabric strip that is about one and a half times the circumference of your leg. You’ll also need some lace trim, elastic, a needle and thread (or a sewing machine), and any other decorative embellishments you want to include on your garter.

  • Next, get your thigh measurement. Figure out exactly where on your thigh you want the garter to go, and measure the circumference of your thigh in that spot.
  • Turn the fabric strip so that the wrong side is facing outward, then fold it length-wise in half.
  • Then sew the edge of the fabric, and then turn the tube of it so that the right side is facing outward.
  • Find the seam in the back and center it. Once the seam is flat it will face your leg so that it will be hidden once the garter is on.
  • Find your lace strip and sew it onto the bottom edge of the strip.
  • Next you’ll need to put the elastic into the tube of the fabric. If the elastic is being stubborn and won’t make it’s way all the way through then pull it out and pin a safety pin to the end of it and push it through.
  • Now it’s time to place the garter around your thigh and find a comfortable measurement for the elastic. Once you’ll found the perfect length, mark it and trim it.
  • Use either a needle and thread or a sewing machine to sew the two ends of the strip together, creating a circle. Begin with the elastic, and then move to the fabric and then lace.
  • The last step is to add any embellishments you would like to your garter. Some popular items include faux flowers, crystals, pearls, and bows.

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8 Reasons to Have a Small Wedding

Apr08

If you’re on the fence about having a small wedding ceremony, you might like to know that there are a lot of perks to doing so. While a large and lavish wedding may seem like a dream come true, the realities that accompany such a large affair might not be worth the extra dough and energy. Explore the following reasons as to why an intimate wedding might be the best route for you.

1. Large weddings require a lot of energy and time to plan, which equals more stress. If you choose to have a small wedding, then you’re proactively cutting out unneeded stress during the planning process, as well as your wedding day.

2. Are you planning a wedding or a production? Large weddings typically have banquet captains and wedding planners behind the scenes equipped with headsets and walkie-talkies that coordinate each step in the production. Smaller weddings don’t require this type of manpower and reflect that by exuding a more personal and relaxed energy.

3. The most obvious reason to opt for a smaller wedding is because you’ll save money. Weddings, unless you go the extreme minimalist route, are expensive regardless of the size, however you’d be surprised at just how much you can save by cutting down the guest list. Every wedding guest requires an invitation, a meal, drinks, and a designated spot at your wedding; all of which comes at a cost.

4. If you have a smaller wedding, then you’ll be able to allocate more of your budget to your wedding getaways. How nice would it be to schedule a spa day a day or two prior to your wedding? Or going over seas to an exotic destination for your honeymoon instead of having to stay close to home?

5. There are countless romantic wedding destinations to choose from, but if you’re working with a small budget then you’ll most likely need to cut down your guest list in order to have your wedding at one. Destination weddings tend to be on the smaller side anyway, since a lot of wedding guests aren’t able to get away.

6. The fewer guests you have, the more time you’ll have to allocate to each guest. It’s proper wedding etiquette to visit with each guest at some point during your wedding reception and thank him or her for coming. If there are 600 guests at your wedding, then this respectful gesture becomes almost impossible.

7. If you opt to have a smaller guest list, then you can put more money into other aspects of your wedding, for example your wedding dinner. Having fewer guests could give you the opportunity to be choosey about your wedding food.

8. Fewer guests also means you’ll have more venue options to choose from. For example you could hold your wedding at a home, in a backyard, a park, vineyard, restaurant, art gallery, or perhaps an adorable bed and breakfast.

There are two (or more) sides to every aspect of your wedding planning, including the size of your guest list. The most important aspect of this decision is that you know the pro’s and con’s of each, so that you can make the right decision that fits your budget and wedding vision.

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Wedding Planning Websites for Minimalists

Apr07

These days, you can find information on just about anything in just a few clicks. Since minimalism is on the rise, so are websites about this movement, and way of life. If you are a minimalist who’s on the lookout for wedding planning websites, then make a note of the following minimalist sites.

This bridal planning website is fantastic because it’s a blog written by Alison Andrews, a bride who had a full-blown minimalist wedding from beginning to end. Alison and her husband, Jaye, decided to have a minimalist wedding mainly because it financially made sense for them, and also because of their lack of time. Alison was prepping for her graduation, which took place the day after their wedding, as well as a move to Taiwan with Jaye for one year to teach English. An extreme wedding didn’t make sense for Alison and Jaye because they were gearing up to move their lives post vows.

Alison and her fiancé got married at their local Home Affairs Office in their hometown of Cape Town. Only their closest family members were there as Alison and Jaye exchanged their vows, wearing non-traditional wedding garb—casual outfits they already had.

Alison and Jaye, with the help of their friends and family, had small wedding bouquets, off-the-cuff wedding photos, and the perfect minimalist wedding experience.

Alison’s blog delves into every other aspect of her minimalist wedding, including her and Jaye’s wedding bands, the reception, her minimalist wedding car (a VW Bug), and more.

Paper Doll Romance is another great wedding blog for minimalists. It's a blog about “romance, weddings, and generally girly things.” This blog will inspire minimalist brides throughout their search for answers, ideas, and general wedding guidance.

This blog has great ideas about your wedding venue, and agrees that most wedding venues are bombarded with brocade curtains, patterned carpets, and chandeliers, which are visually overbearing and unnecessary. For the minimalist, a venue with an abundance of wide-open space is ideal, and should look like a blank canvas. Open, white, modern spaces are the perfect space for minimalist couples to have a wedding that represents their way of life, and gives them free reign to scatter a few simple candles, vases, and flowers.

This post also offers some great photos for wedding inspiration in regards to your wedding dining tables, flowers, name cards, wedding cake, wedding dress, and bridesmaid dresses.

For those of you seeing advice on minimalism, explore SimpleRabbit and BeMoreWithLess.

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7 Practical Tips for DIY Wedding Invitations

Apr06

If you are planning to make DIY wedding invitations, it is incredibly important that you set aside enough time. A DIY wedding is worth it only if you do not allow it to stress you out too much, and if the time you spend is worth the amount of money you save. Here are a few tips for DIY wedding invitations:

1. One of the best ways to sabotage an effort at DIY invitations is to miscalculate the amount of time they are going to take you. Most wedding experts recommend that you send out your invitations at least 6-8 weeks before your wedding, and you should probably set aside approximately two months to complete the entire task of designing, assembling, printing, and addressing your invitations. The time may also vary, depending on how large your wedding is (and how many invitations you will have to address!) It may also depend on how much help you have. The process can be tedious, so you will want to do it in increments so that you can actually enjoy it. If you are completely stressed and pressed for time, you will not have fun!

2. Decide on your envelopes before you begin designing your invitations. This is crucial, because there are very specific sizes out there. You do not want to finish designing and printing out your invitations and then realize that the size envelope you need is actually nonexistent! Choose your envelopes first; the paper size will follow.

3. When you choose your paper, make sure it is a bit smaller than your envelope to allow for wiggle room. Also, double check to make sure that any inserts you want to include will also fit within the envelope dimensions.

4. Before deciding on an invitation design, print it out to see what it will look like on actual paper. If you still love your design as much when looking at it in hard copy (not on a computer screen), then it is probably the right one!

5. If possible, take a calligraphy class, or recruit friends or family with beautiful handwriting. Taking a calligraphy class will come in handy not just for addressing your wedding invitations, but also for the many thank you notes you will be writing in the months to come. A tangible, handwritten note or letter has so much value, given that we live in an age of texts, twitters, RSS feeds, and emails. Knowing how to write beautifully will give you an unexpected edge, not just for your wedding season, but also professionally.

6. Have several people proofread your invitation before you send it. It is truly embarrassing to send out an invitation with typos; like your wedding, your invitations should be elegant, classy and as flawless as possible.

7. Weigh everything before you buy postage to buy the right amount.

Remember: if DIY wedding trends are not for you, or if the amount of time you would spend simply is not worth it, do not despair. Some people really enjoy the process of making wedding invitations, centerpieces, etc.; others do not. If you are in the “do not” category, simply sit back and enjoy the process of choosing your invitation design and having them professionally addressed!

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Minimalist Wedding Flowers

Apr04

For those of you who live by minimalist standards, being that your goal is to live more without the clutter of material items, then you’ll want to choose floral wedding decorations that reflect that way of life. From your minimalist wedding table decorations, to your bouquet, how you choose your wedding day flowers should be an extension of your minimalistic ideal.

Since the model for living a minimalistic way of life begins with less, choose a wedding bouquet that includes only one varietal, and perhaps only one color. Use the following ideas as inspiration for your bouquets or wedding reception decorations:

A minimalist bouquet made of only roses would be lovely and simple. You can choose whichever color roses you’d like, however keep in mind that white is the most minimalistic color because it exudes a calming energy and looks simple. If you choose white roses as your reception centerpieces, then place them in a transparent vase with water. If you also use them for your bouquet, then place a white ribbon around them to secure the flowers together.

Another fantastic minimalist bouquet is one comprised of white tulips because this varietal encapsulates simplicity and sweetness. As with the aforementioned rose bouquet, you are welcome to choose a different color, just make sure you only use one varietal per bouquet or centerpiece.

A bouquet of hawthorn flowers in both pink and white is more complicated, but ideal for the minimalist who wants to add some spice to her simple wedding. The reason this bouquet is still considered to be minimalistic is because it is comprised of only one varietal. What makes it interesting is that hawthorn flowers come in different sizes, so you’re welcome to include flowers of varying size to create a bouquet that’s simple, yet interesting.

Figuring out what to tie your bouquets together with can be challenging because you don’t want to add too much. A simple ribbon is perfect, but if you want to go the green route, feel free to explore hemp ribbon or string. A strong vine is always a fantastic option—it’s natural, a simple mixture of brown and green, and pleasing to the eye.

An accessory that you’re welcome to use with your reception centerpieces is rock. Since rocks are calming, simple, and natural, you can use them to fill up transparent vases, bowls, or to help hold flowers in place. Rocks also add an extra special something to your wedding decor without having to spend more money than you planned.

Apply the aforementioned bouquet ideas to your flower girl bouquet, bridesmaid’s bouquets, and any flowers you might use as boutonnières or corsages. As long as you choose simple flowers that match your minimalistic ideals, then you're well on your way to having a wedding with less—but still has it all.

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Designing Your Wedding Invitation List

Apr01

When it comes time to begin your wedding guest list, there are three questions that you need to answer:

Do I want a large, medium, or small wedding reception?
A small wedding reception can be intimate and lovely, but for people with very large families, they are sometimes not possible. Do your best to blend what you want with what is practical for your situation.

When you picture yourself getting married, who are you unable to imagine not being there?
Even if there is someone who you do not see often (yet who perhaps played a very influential role in your life), you should invite him or her. This could be a high school English teacher who played an important role in your career. Inviting people like that says a lot to them, even if they are unable to attend your wedding.

Who do you not want at the wedding?
This could include a number of people, but more than likely, it’s not people you necessarily “dislike.” For personal reasons, you may decide that you do not want children at the wedding, so no children are included in the guest list. You may not want to open the invitation to work colleagues, which is completely acceptable. The more consistent you are with your choices, the better you will be able to explain your wedding invitation list to people who didn’t get invited.

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Planning a Minimalist Wedding

Mar31

If you’re a minimalist, then less is more, even when it comes to planning your wedding. Fortunately, there are many ways for brides or wedding planners to adhere to the minimalist style of doing things. Your wedding planning checklist will look similar to any other bride’s, but your intentions will be focused on having a simple, organized, and modern day wedding.

Location
A great place to start is at your location. Be on the lookout for wedding venues that have a minimalistic look. Shy away from five star hotels, mansions, castles, and cathedrals, and focus more on simple, sleek, and small spaces that are just big enough to fit your wedding guests. Explore modern facilities that look simple and clean. You might consider art galleries, museums, lofts, or even your own home. Your venue is of the utmost importance considering you won’t have many extra decorations to make it look nicer than it actually is. Once you find a venue that looks beautiful on it’s own, without having to add any bells or whistles, then the rest of your minimalist wedding details will fall perfectly into place.

Color
When it comes to minimalism, color is crucial. If you pick colors that are too loud or distracting, like red, or fuchsia, then it could detract from your minimalist style and have an adverse effect on your wedding as a whole. Explore muted colors such as espresso, or olive green. Greens, blues, and white are the most popular and effective minimalistic colors. You want your wedding colors to calm, not excite. Keep this in mind when picking your wedding flowers, invitations, bridesmaids dresses, table linens, etc.

Gown
Your wedding gown is also a key player in your minimalistic wedding. This can be tricky because you might find dresses that you love, that don’t adhere to minimalism standards. The key is to stay focused when you’re shopping and if you find a dress that has frills and embellishments, don’t try it on and keep on looking. Explore wedding dresses that are simple, with clean lines and very little detail. Also be aware that your dress should fit you well. A loose, baggy gown could look frumpy and a bit too big. If you find a simple dress you love that is too big, then have it altered to fit your body perfectly. A gorgeous, yet clean and simple fabric to keep in mind is silk Mikado. If you choose a simple gown with this type of fabric you will find that it won’t need any embellishments or added details, such as embroidery or lace.

Accessories
When choosing your wedding accessories, like jewelry, less is more. Small diamond stud earrings, and perhaps a simple diamond pendant necklace are stunning choices that will shine brightly when paired with a simple gown. If you have your heart set on danglers or droplet earrings, then opt out of a necklace or bracelets. When choosing your jewelry also be aware of the fact that minimalism doesn’t mean a lack of style, so choose any style you love, just keep your final choices to a minimum.

Planning weddings can be stressful, but since you’re coming from a minimalist point of view you’ll find that your guidelines will simplify the process.

Read more:

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Wedding Planning Websites: DIY Brides are Staying Online

Mar31

There are tons of wedding planning websites out there to use while gearing up for one of the most important days of your life. Fortunately, ourweddingday.com is a one-stop shop that offers planning tools and services that will keep you right on track from the moment you put that engagement ring on your finger, until you’ve stamped the last thank you note.

Personalized wedding websites aren’t going anywhere. In fact, creating your own website is quickly becoming the norm. Ourweddingday.com allows you to create your own wedding website that essentially replaces the bulky wedding binder of yesteryear. On your personalized wedding website you can choose a design that fits your style, tell your site visitors your story, upload photos of you and your fiancé, organize your wedding-related parties, rehearsals, and create guest lists. You can also post location, travel and accommodation details for your wedding guests, and also share guest book notes. It’s an invaluable tool not only for you to use, but for your wedding guests as well. Your website is also a fantastic way to cut down on the use of paper and the need to organize business cards and small slips of paper from wedding vendors that could easily slip through the cracks. Most of all, your own website will give you peace of mind just knowing all of your wedding related information is contained on one site.

Once you’ve created your own wedding website, you can then navigate through ourweddingday.com for guidance and tips on anything and everything wedding related. Ourweddingday.com offers and hints and tips on the following: Wedding Fashion & Beauty, Wedding Traditions & Etiquette, Booking & Hiring Vendors, Wedding Planning, The Wedding Reception, Wedding Travel & Honeymoon, Wedding Gift Registry, as well as wedding guides for the following cities: New York-Chicago, Dallas, Miami, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Indianapolis, Houston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston, Newark, and Baltimore.

Under “Tips & Advice” for wedding guides for specifics cities, you will find information regarding your cities wedding bands, officiants guide, videographers guide, bakers guide, photographers guide and more.

If you think wedding advice websites could not possibly offer a bride more information—think again. OurWeddingDay.com also allows you to create your wedding save-the-date cards online and send them as e-cards. Along with this service you are able to update your address books, which allows you to automatically update your guests’ contact info and quickly send your save-the-date cards as well as e-cards.

Planning your wedding can get stressful, and at times you may run out of ideas. Fortunately, ourweddingday.com is one of the few bridal wedding websites that offers a community forum. Interacting with other brides-to-be, exchanging ideas, asking and answering questions about anything wedding related is one simple click away. Even if you have a ton of friends who are either getting married or have been married, sometimes objective unbiased advice is what you need to make a decision about your wedding dress, wedding venue, honeymoon, or even pre-wedding day jitters.

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4 Wedding Rehearsal Etiquette Tips

Mar29

Traditionally, the rehearsal dinner is the groom and groom’s parents project; therefore, they decide where it will be located, who will be invited, and they are expected to give toasts. Modern wedding rehearsal etiquette is much less defined, and usually determined by whoever is footing the bill. Here are a few things to remember about rehearsal dinner etiquette:

It does not have to be fancy. It is perfectly acceptable to host the rehearsal dinner at a bowling alley, in someone’s backyard for a barbeque, or even have a potluck.

If the cost of the wedding is shared between the bride and groom’s parents, then it is perfectly fair to suggest that the cost of the rehearsal dinner be shared as well.

If the bride and the groom are hosting, or if the groom’s parents are hosting, then the groom should definitely give a toast. He should remember that it does not necessarily need to be long and eloquent; it should be sincere, show his excitement for his wedding day, and should thank his parents and the wedding party for all they have done.

Wedding rehearsal etiquette also dictates that the father of the groom give a toast. Again, this may change depending on who is footing the bill. The father or mother of the bride can also give toasts if they’d like. The first toast usually begins after the drinks are served and before the first course of the meal.

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Ideas for Catholic Wedding Readings

Mar29

There are four Catholic wedding readings that typically comprise a Catholic wedding ceremony. The first reading (from the Old Testament), a Responsorial Psalm, the second reading (from the New Testament), and a fourth reading from the Gospel. Here is the typical order of the Catholic wedding readings within the ceremony, starting after the seating of the families, the wedding processional, and the entrance of the bride:

First, an Opening Prayer is usually given by the priest.

The First Reading typically comes from the Catholic book The Rite of Marriage. Here are a few options:

  1. Genesis 1:26-28, 31: “God created man and woman.”
  2. Genesis 2:18-24: “The two of them became one body.”
  3. Proverbs 31: 10-13: “A woman who fears the Lord is to be praised.”
  4. Tobit 8:5-7: “Allow us to live together to a happy old age.”
  5. Genesis 24: “In his love for Rebekah, Isaac found solace after the death of his mother."
  6. Tobit 7: “May the Lord of heaven prosper you both. May he grant you mercy and peace.”
  7. Sirach 26: “Like the sun rising in the Lord’s heavens, the beauty of a virtuous wife is the radiance of her home.”
  8. Jeremiah 31: “I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah.”

 

In Catholic Wedding Traditions, the Responsorial Psalm is typically recited by a cantor, or song leader. The cantor sings the verses, then leads the assembly in the response (which is typically the title of the psalm). Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Psalm 33:12, 18, 20-21, 22: “The earth is full of the goodness of the Lord.”
  2. Psalm 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9: “I will bless the Lord at all times.”
  3. Psalm 103: “The Lord is kind and merciful.”
  4. Psalm 128: “Happy are those who fear the Lord.”
  5. Psalm 145: “The Lord is compassionate to all his creatures.”
  6. Psalm 148: “Let us praise the name of the Lord.”

 

The Second Reading is then given from the New Testament. Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Romans 8: “What will separate us from the love of Christ?"
  2. 1 Corinthians: “Your body is the temple of the “Holy Spirit;” If I do not have love, I am nothing.”
  3. Philippians 4:4-9: “The God of peace will be with you.”
  4. Colossians 3:12-17: “And over all these put on love, that is, the bond of perfection.”
  5. 1 John 4:7-12: “Love in deed and in truth.”
  6. Revelation 19:5-9: “Blessed are those who have been called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.”

 

The Gospel Reading is usually given by the priest. Here are some suggestions:

  1. Matthew 5:1-12: “Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven.”
  2. Matthew 19:3-6: “What God has united, man must not separate.”
  3. Mark 10: 6-9: “They are no long two, but one flesh.”
  4. John 15: 12-16: “This is my commandment: love one another.”

 

Next comes the Homily, which is typically a short sermon or word given from the prist. The homily is followed by the exchange of Catholic Wedding Vows, followed by the Blessing and Exchange of Rings. After the rings are exchanged, there is a Lighting of the Unity Candle, usually accompanied by a song.

Finally, there is the Concluding Rite. Usually the Lord's Prayer, the Assembly joins together to recite this prayer, led by the priest. A final blessing is given, and the ressional begins.

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